Year 2 Maths Homework Solver - Homework for you

Homework for you

Year 2 Maths Homework Solver

Rating: 4.9/5.0 (27 Votes)

Category: Homework

Description

Problem Solving

Guide and features
  • Teachers

    Guide and features

  • Featured Early Years Foundation Stage; US Kindergarten Early years
  • primary

    Featured UK Key Stage 1&2; US Grades 1-5 Primary teachers
  • secondary

    Featured UK Key Stage 3-5; US Grades 6-12 Secondary teachers
    • primary lower

      Featured UK Key Stage 1, US Grade 1 & 2 primary
    • primary

      Featured UK Key Stage 2; US Grade 3-5
    • secondary lower

      Featured UK Key Stages 3 & 4; US Grade 6-10 secondary
    • secondary upper

      Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
    • Events

      Problem Solving

      Problem Solving

      This feature is somewhat larger than our usual features, but that is because it is packed with resources to help you develop a problem-solving approach to the teaching and learning of mathematics. Read Lynne's article which discusses the place of problem solving in the new curriculum and sets the scene. In the second article, Jennie offers you practical ways to investigate aspects of your classroom culture and in the third article, she suggests three ways in which we can support children in becoming competent problem solvers. The fourth article builds on the third by discussing what we mean by problem-solving skills and how NRICH can help children develop these skills. Scroll down to see groups of tasks from the site which will give learners experience of specific skills.

      Stage: 1 and 2

      Is problem solving at the heart of your curriculum? In this article for teachers, Lynne explains why it should be.

      Stage: 1 and 2

      This article offers you practical ways to investigate aspects of your classroom culture.

      Stage: 1 and 2

      Becoming confident and competent as a problem solver is a complex process that requires a range of skills and experience. In this article, Jennie suggests that we can support this process in three principal ways.

      Stage: 1 and 2

      This article, written for primary teachers, discusses what we mean by 'problem-solving skills' and draws attention to NRICH tasks which can help develop specific skills.

      These lower primary tasks could all be tackled using a trial and improvement approach.

      These upper primary tasks could all be tackled using a trial and improvement approach.

      Tasks for KS1 children which focus on working systematically.

      Tasks for KS2 children which focus on working systematically.

      Stage: 1 and 2

      The tasks in this collection encourage children to create, recognise, extend and explain number patterns.

      The lower primary tasks in this collection could each be solved by working backwards.

      The upper primary tasks in this collection could each be solved by working backwards.

      Stage: 1 and 2

      This feature draws together tasks which give learners opportunities to reason for different purposes.

      These lower primary tasks all specifically draw on the use of visualising.

      These upper primary tasks all specifically draw on the use of visualising.

      The tasks in this collection encourage lower primary children to conjecture and generalise.

      The tasks in this collection encourage upper primary children to conjecture and generalise.

    Other articles

    App Shopper: Math Homework Solver (Education)

    Math Homework Solver


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    What's New

    Compatible to iOS 5.0 and later.
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    TG Softwares

    FX Math Solver

    Easy to use and powerful expression editor.

    • Visual(WYSIWYG) math editor
    • Support full math symbol keys
    • Support keywords
    • Problem templates for common problems

    Detailed and animatable step-by-step solution.

    • Easily browsable static solution document
    • Animatable solution procedures
    • Multiple solutions provided when alternative solution methods are avaiable
    • Cite the formula applied in the solution

    Automatic problem type recognition and problem text generation.

    • Extract the problem type from the typed-in expressions only.
    • Generate verbal problem statements from pure input problem expressions.

    Cover most of the math subjects in PreAlgebra, Algebra 1/2, and Calculus for high school and college students.

    • Algebra
      • Number
        • Integer, decimal
        • Fraciton, mixed number
        • Complex
      • Expression
        • Polynomial
        • Rational
        • Radical
        • Logarithm, exponential
        • Radical
      • Equation and Inequality
      • Function
        • Operations
        • Domain, range, Inverse
      • Matrix
        • Operations
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    • Calculus
      • Limit
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    How can type-in keys like e. z. A. and more Since mathematical expressions need many special keys, those keys are grouped according to similarity:
    • a. b. c. x. y. z
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    • sin. cos. tan.
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    To type-in a key invisible in the keyboard, hold down a similar key in the same key group. For instance, to type in e. hold down x key in the keyboard, and to type in tan. hold down sin key. What does the premium-pack offer
    • Allows unlimited access to the problem solving server of FX Math Solver.
    • Allows to view the solution steps for all the sample problems in the App.
    What is the difference between FX Math Solver and FX Math for Education
    • FX Math Solver is for personal users(students), and FX Math for Education is for the volumn purchase users like the educational institutions.
    • FX Math for Education does not require to purchase the premium pack for the ulimited server access.
    • Both apps are same in functionality and features supported.
    What is the difference between FX Math Solver and FX Algebra Solver
    • FX Math Solver is for both high school and college students, and FX Algebra Solver is mainly for high school students.
    • FX Math Solver covers the topics in both Algebra and Caculus, and FX Algebra Solver covers only Algebra 1/2.
    • Following topics are supported only by FX Math Solver
      • Limit
      • Derivative
      • Integral

    MalMath: Step by step solver 2

    Description

    MalMath is a math problem solver with step bystep description and graph view. It’s free and works offline.
    Solve:
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    • Derivatives
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    • Trigonometry
    • Logarithms
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    • Algebra
    It helps students to understand the solving process and others whohave problems on their homework. It is helpful for high school andcollege students, teachers and parents.
    Key MalMath features:
    • Step by step description with detailed explanationfor each step.
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    MalMath: Step by step solver Version History

    Tricky maths question for six-year-olds is leaving adults scratching their heads

    Can YOU solve it? Tricky maths question for six-year-olds is leaving adults scratching their heads
    • Maths homework was posted to Facebookby the Holderness family
    • The challenge is to substitute letters for numbers using a key that was provided
    • Four of the letters are arranged in a pattern with a missing box, and the question is to work out which letter should go in the missing box

    Parents have been left stumped by at a six-year-old's maths homework.

    The question, which was posted on Facebook by the Holderness family in North Carolina, involves substituting numbers for letters.

    While the challenge was supposed to cause the first grader to think in different ways, it proved difficult for most of the adults tackling the question.

    The question (pictured), which was posted on Facebook by the Holderness family, involves substituting numbers for letters. While the challenge was supposed to cause the first grader to think in different ways, it proved difficult for most of the adults tackling it

    'Internet friends: solve this 1st grade math homework,' the Holderness family wrote on Facebook. along with a picture of their son holding up his question.

    ' The picture shows some letters that are arranged in a pattern,' the puzzle says.

    'Use the key to find the missing letter.'

    It seems like a simple question, but people reacting in the comments were left confused.

    RELATED ARTICLES Share this article

    One person even said: 'What purpose does this serve in life? Whatever happened to normal math homework.'

    After some discussion, the family added: 'FYI, this was the final page on a 7 page sheet, the previous 6 pages were a much more normal level for a first grader.

    'I don't think the teacher expects everyone to get this, I think it was meant to be a problem that would challenge the children, so for that reason I think it's great that our school included it!'

    THE ANSWER

    The answer lies in making each diagonal column add up to the same number.

    Take the value of the S, B, and G and add them to get 40.

    Then subtract the values of B and P from 40.

    That leaves a difference of 14, which is letter J. It all has to do with getting children to think in complex ways.

    After hours of debate in the comment section of the picture, Jamie Nantz provided what he thinks is the answer.

    The answer lies in making each diagonal column add up to the same number.

    'It is a complex math question that requires you to substitute the letters with numbers,' he said.

    'You take the value of the S, B, and G and add them to get 40.

    'Then you subtract the values of B and P from 40.

    'That leaves a difference of 14, which is letter J. It all has to do with getting children to think in complex ways.'

    Last year, a similarly tricky maths question aimed at year 2 pupils which involves figuring out how many passengers were originally on a train is the latest brain teaser to leave the internet confused.

    The question read: 'There were some people on a train. 19 people get off the train at the first stop. 17 people get on the train. Now there are 63 people on the train. How many people were on the train to begin with?'

    Mother Louise Bloxham shared the test on Twitter as she couldn't believe the tough teaser was aimed at children as young as six, and her followers were certainly left confused as they battled to figure out the correct answer.

    A maths question aimed at year 2 pupils which involves figuring out how many passengers were originally on a train is the latest brain teaser to leave the internet confused

    Louise Bloxham shared the test on Twitter as she couldn't believe the tough teaser was aimed at children as young as five. Some of her followers figured out that the correct answer was 65

    Neil Hughes and Robyn Duckworth insisted the answer was definitely 65 as did Lewis Haddow who worked it out using algebra: X - 19 + 17 = 63. X = 65.'

    He added: That's quite hard for Year 2.'

    But Louise confused things further by explaining someone had posted the answer on a Facebook forum for teachers saying it was definitely 46.

    'You ignore the 19 - they are a red herring presumably. So 63 - 17 = 46.'

    The correct answer is in fact 65, which you arrive at by subtracting the 17 people who just boarded from the current number of passengers, 63, to get 46. Then you add the 19 passengers who got off to arrive at 65.