Literary Analysis Essay 1984 Superstate - Homework for you

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Literary Analysis Essay 1984 Superstate

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Orwell’s Totalitarian Government in 1984 Essay - Literary Analysis

Orwell’s Totalitarian Government in 1984 Essay

George Orwell’s key objective throughout his novel, 1984, was to convey to his readers the imminent threat of the severe danger that totalitarianism could mean for the world. Orwell takes great measures to display the horrifying effects that come along with complete and dominant control that actually comes along with totalitarian government. In Orwell’s novel, personal liberties and individual freedoms that are protected and granted to many Americans today, are taken away and ripped from the citizen’s lives. The government takes away freedom and rights from the people so that the ruling class (which makes up the government), while reign with complete supremacy and possess all power.
George Orwell declared himself as a Socialist, and he was a strong believer that people desperately need to maintain a sense of willingness to rebel against the government, in case there is ever need for it (rebellion). Orwell did not fear rebelling and taking a stand for what he believed in. This is evident especially because Orwell wrote this famous novel, that is now classified around the world as must-read literature, to bring awareness to the world, and the potential oppression that could eventually form if things continued in the way they were currently going at the time.
Orwell lived in a time when communism was a very clear and present danger that was beginning to be enforced in many parts of the world. During this time, it was believed by many that the central ideas presented by a communist government were ideal for all of society. However, Orwell knew differently.
Orwell was able to envision how a seemingly supreme communist government would most definitely come along with the removal of liberties, freedoms, and rights of the people. Or.


. middle of paper.


. ally become of a world where leaders forced their communist ideas and rules upon all people, and Orwell was brave enough to point out what was inevitable to happen.

1. "The Political Ideas of George Orwell | The Socialist Party of Great Britain." World Socialist Movement. N.p. n.d. Web. 18 May 2012.
2. Orwell, George. 1984, a novel. New York: New American Library, 1949. Print.
3. Arno, The. "Oscar Wilde - Biography and Works. Search Texts, Read Online. Discuss.." The Literature Network: Online classic literature, poems, and quotes. Essays & Summaries. N.p. n.d. Web. 10 May 2012.
4. Fuchs, Thomas. A concise biography of Adolf Hitler. Berkley ed. New York: Berkley Books, 2000. Print.

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1984 Literary Analysis Essay Research Paper 1984

1984 Literary Analysis Essay Research Paper 1984

1984 Literary Analysis Essay, Research Paper

1984’s main character is Winston Smith, a man who doubts the ethics of the over powering tyrannical government that rules Oceania, one of three superstates in the world of 1984. Big Brother, the given to the government in the book, has developed its own language, is at constant war with the other two superstates, and watches its citizens at all times. The book starts off with Winston slowly figuring out that Big Brother is not exactly what it seems and in this society thinking for yourself has become punishable by death. As Winston’s rebellion progresses he begins to wonder if life has always been this way or if life had once consisted of a government which allowed people to think for themselves and be individuals. He could not remember very well as to what life was like before Big Brother came into existence, only bits as pieces of his childhood could be recollected, but nothing to establish any solid evidence of there ever being another type of government other that Big Brother.

Oceania, Eastasia, and Eurasia are the three battling superstates. Each has an identical government, one that is at a never-ending war with each other in order to gain complete power over the people that live there. They did this by using methods developed by past dictators such as Stalin, Mussolini and Hitler. Big Brother manipulates its citizens into making them think the way that they want them to think. However, instead of only using brainwashing techniques, Big Brother also uses Newspeak and telescreens. Newspeak is the official language of Oceania, it was created with its only intention of abolishing all unorthodox thought, for example, the word bad is replaced by the word ‘ungood.’ The telescreens watch all of the people that are allowed to be educated, at all times, watching for any action, word, or possible thought that could be unorthodox.

These two Orwell inventions were foretelling that we see the equivalent of Newspeak every day in present day society when we are “politically correct.” Telescreens are present in nearly every commercial institution, and sometimes in our own homes. I think that Orwell may have been trying to warn America and all other countries about the control of over powering governments.

When a coworker named Julia secretly approaches Winston, he learns that he is not alone in his belief that Big Brother is ‘ungood.’ Winston and Julia become lovers and eventually begin to share their feelings of rebelliousness to O’Brien, another fellow coworker who is believed to be a member of a rebel group known as the Brotherhood. About two weeks later the shocking and disturbing turning point of the story is unveiled. Here is where Orwell introduces the whole philosophy behind this book. Orwell also brings terror into the story when he writes about what is really behind Big Brother; Oceania’s government sends a representative into the plot. A government, very similar to many of the governments in our present society, is at the head of Oceania, and that is where the unmistakable reality of 1984 becomes obvious. The sole manipulative technique used by Big Brother is one that is virtually unrecognizable-mental deception. Metaphysics, or the belief that there is existence beyond our comprehension, is represented by Big Brother when the reader learns about doublethink, the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one’s mind at the same time and fully accepting both of them. Doublethink and metaphysics are the engines behind the three world governments, and is defined by O’Brien. “Reality exists in the human mind, and nowhere else,” says O’Brien. ”. In the mind of the Party, which is collective and immortal. Whatever the Party holds to be truth is truth.”

Orwell ends the book with Big Brother arresting Winston. They beat him senseless on many occasions and continually torture him. This is not done to merely make him confess that he was committed a crime or even to make him say that he thinks that Big Brother is right. They have a way of torturing people in order to actually break the person down to where he can no longer tell what its true and what is not. When this is accomplished what they have is basically a shell of a man, unable to think for himself, they then reprogram his mind. One example of this in the book is when O’Brien, who is actually one of the leaders of Big Brother, uses a torturing device in order to make Winston believe that 2 + 2 = 5. Winston knew what O’Brien was trying to do and tried to resist, but there came a point after many countless hours possibly even a day or two of torture that when O’Brien held up four fingers Winston actually saw five. At the very end of the book they let Winston go, however, not before they were successful with reprogramming his mind. The very last line in the book is Winston saying, “I love Big Brother.”

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Critical Survey of Science Fiction and Fantasy 1984 Analysis - Essay

Critical Survey of Science Fiction and Fantasy 1984 Analysis - Essay Critical Survey of Science Fiction and Fantasy 1984 Analysis

(Critical Survey of Science Fiction and Fantasy)

Few novels have had the impact of Nineteen Eighty-Four. Even those who have not read the novel are familiar with terms such as “Big Brother” and “doublethink.” Although the novel may be read as a grim political satire on George Orwell’s time—the horrors of the modern totalitarian state, whether Joseph Stalin’s Soviet Union in the 1930’s or Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich in the 1940’s—it easily qualifies as a dystopic vision of a nightmarish future awaiting the world if it ignores modern assaults on human freedom. Its warning of a negative utopia has not diminished with the passage of the year 1984, for its menace is just as possible for 2084 or 2184.

Clearly, Oceania, like the other superstates of Eurasia and Eastasia, is an extension of twentieth century totalitarianism’s efforts to eradicate individuality. Orwell’s analysis of the planned exhaustion of excess economic productivity on military expenditures to preserve the inequities of a traditional class system is brilliant. In fact, “the book” that O’Brien claims he coauthored with the Inner Party reads like the secret history of twentieth century political economics.

Unlike other classics of speculative or science fiction such as Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World (1932), Orwell’s science fiction lacks much of the advanced technological hardware readers associate with the genre. That lack, however, is justified within Nineteen Eighty-Four by Oceania’s spokesman, O’Brien, who tells Winston that science and technology persist only as weapons of oppression. These weapons include use of psychology to engineer pain or technology like the telescreen for surveillance. Weaponry itself has retreated to pre-Hiroshima levels, nuclear weapons having been eliminated as threats to the status quo of the three superstates. Science and technology, Orwell suggests, had to be curtailed because in their purest forms they are grounded in the spirit of innovation and free inquiry. As O’Brien brags, Big Brother could rewrite astronomy to make the stars mere miles away from Earth if such a “truth” accorded with unrestrained exercise of power by the Party.

It is no coincidence that Winston works in the Ministry of Truth. Like other totalitarian leaders in the twentieth century, “Big Brother,” or the Inner Party collectively, knows that truth is textual. The most successful dictators control their subjects through propaganda and the manipulation of history. Winston wanders through the proles’ district hoping to find some corroboration of his own recollection of life before Big Brother but discovers the unreliability of the proles’ memory and returns to his own job of rewriting history, a job he finds so stimulating that he passes up the opportunity to fade into the proles’ world with Julia. Besides, in this hierarchical system, Winston prides himself on his superiority to these “masses.”

Winston envisions his experience in the novel as a tragic contest with the state to demonstrate his own superiority as an individual. Time and again, he boasts to Julia that although they will inevitably be tortured and killed, they, or at least he. will never surrender his humanity. Love, loyalty, decency, and nobility represent “humanness” to Winston and also to Orwell. Tragedy, the narrator indicates, may no longer be possible because the privacy and family loyalty on which it depends are under threat. Winston casts himself in the role of a traditional tragic hero, flaunting his pride in the individual’s capacity to suffer all yet maintain dignity. When Winston proclaims the “spirit of Man” and O’Brien tells him to look in a mirror, Winston sees an image chillingly like those that confronted the liberators of the Nazi concentration camps. Winston embodies the tragedy of liberal humanism, naïvely confident that it could withstand any suffering without the surrender of a quintessential “humanity.”

As a vision of a dystopic future, Nineteen Eighty-Four is grounded in a psychology Orwell both fears is valid but hopes is not. First, the novel asks whether a state constructed on terror and unrestrained power can survive without a collective “mental breakdown.” O’Brien’s insane lust for the sadistic exercise of power has seemed to some more terrifying than his menacing rats. Another question on which the novel’s psychology rests is whether the “spirit of man,” or faith in the individual, can be destroyed by torture and brainwashing such as Winston’s in Room 101. How responsible are individuals for what is beyond their control? Finally, the novel poses the question of the individual’s ability to stay sane in an insane world, where all the texts that might confirm reality are manipulated by a state intent on serving its mad religion of power. Readers must answer these profound questions for themselves.

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1984 Literary Analysis Essay Research Paper 1984

1984 Literary Analysis Essay Research Paper 1984

1984 Literary Analysis Essay, Research Paper

1984’s main character is Winston Smith, a man who doubts the ethics of the over powering tyrannical government that rules Oceania, one of three superstates in the world of 1984. Big Brother, the given to the government in the book, has developed its own language, is at constant war with the other two superstates, and watches its citizens at all times. The book starts off with Winston slowly figuring out that Big Brother is not exactly what it seems and in this society thinking for yourself has become punishable by death. As Winston’s rebellion progresses he begins to wonder if life has always been this way or if life had once consisted of a government which allowed people to think for themselves and be individuals. He could not remember very well as to what life was like before Big Brother came into existence, only bits as pieces of his childhood could be recollected, but nothing to establish any solid evidence of there ever being another type of government other that Big Brother.

Oceania, Eastasia, and Eurasia are the three battling superstates. Each has an identical government, one that is at a never-ending war with each other in order to gain complete power over the people that live there. They did this by using methods developed by past dictators such as Stalin, Mussolini and Hitler. Big Brother manipulates its citizens into making them think the way that they want them to think. However, instead of only using brainwashing techniques, Big Brother also uses Newspeak and telescreens. Newspeak is the official language of Oceania, it was created with its only intention of abolishing all unorthodox thought, for example, the word bad is replaced by the word ‘ungood.’ The telescreens watch all of the people that are allowed to be educated, at all times, watching for any action, word, or possible thought that could be unorthodox.

These two Orwell inventions were foretelling that we see the equivalent of Newspeak every day in present day society when we are “politically correct.” Telescreens are present in nearly every commercial institution, and sometimes in our own homes. I think that Orwell may have been trying to warn America and all other countries about the control of over powering governments.

When a coworker named Julia secretly approaches Winston, he learns that he is not alone in his belief that Big Brother is ‘ungood.’ Winston and Julia become lovers and eventually begin to share their feelings of rebelliousness to O’Brien, another fellow coworker who is believed to be a member of a rebel group known as the Brotherhood. About two weeks later the shocking and disturbing turning point of the story is unveiled. Here is where Orwell introduces the whole philosophy behind this book. Orwell also brings terror into the story when he writes about what is really behind Big Brother; Oceania’s government sends a representative into the plot. A government, very similar to many of the governments in our present society, is at the head of Oceania, and that is where the unmistakable reality of 1984 becomes obvious. The sole manipulative technique used by Big Brother is one that is virtually unrecognizable-mental deception. Metaphysics, or the belief that there is existence beyond our comprehension, is represented by Big Brother when the reader learns about doublethink, the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one’s mind at the same time and fully accepting both of them. Doublethink and metaphysics are the engines behind the three world governments, and is defined by O’Brien. “Reality exists in the human mind, and nowhere else,” says O’Brien. ”. In the mind of the Party, which is collective and immortal. Whatever the Party holds to be truth is truth.”

Orwell ends the book with Big Brother arresting Winston. They beat him senseless on many occasions and continually torture him. This is not done to merely make him confess that he was committed a crime or even to make him say that he thinks that Big Brother is right. They have a way of torturing people in order to actually break the person down to where he can no longer tell what its true and what is not. When this is accomplished what they have is basically a shell of a man, unable to think for himself, they then reprogram his mind. One example of this in the book is when O’Brien, who is actually one of the leaders of Big Brother, uses a torturing device in order to make Winston believe that 2 + 2 = 5. Winston knew what O’Brien was trying to do and tried to resist, but there came a point after many countless hours possibly even a day or two of torture that when O’Brien held up four fingers Winston actually saw five. At the very end of the book they let Winston go, however, not before they were successful with reprogramming his mind. The very last line in the book is Winston saying, “I love Big Brother.”